The Benefits of Lavender Oil for Dogs

October 7, 2019
Lavender oil is calming, reduces swelling, and acts as a natural repellent. Read more about the benefits of lavender oil for dogs in the following article. 

Lavender oil comes from the flowers of lavender plants–a very common plant in the United States. This oil is especially popular among people for its relaxing properties–but it’s also great for dogs. Lavender oil for dogs works as a natural soother, but that’s not all…

Properties of lavender oil

Lavender oil is one of the best-known oils. Thanks to these numerous properties, people have been using it since ancient times:

  • Soothing. When people think of lavender oil, this is the benefit that first comes to mind. It works as a sleep aid, relaxes muscles, and helps to reduce anxious, stressful states.
  • Antiseptic. Lavender has microbial properties, working against viruses and bacteria.
  • Pain-killer. Lavender oil is an effective pain-killer, especially when it comes to muscle pain.
  • Anti-inflammatory. The use of lavender oil in swollen areas reduces inflammation.
  • Healing. It helps wounds, burns, and is also effective in treating acne and dermatitis.

What are the benefits of lavender oil for dogs?

  • Natural relaxer. Its aroma has relaxing properties and helps dogs relax and rest.
  • Insect repellent. Lavender oil by itself or combined with other essential oils such as artemis is an effective insect repellent. This is thanks to its chemical compounds, linalool, and cuminaldehyde. Simply sprinkle a few drops of this oil on the carpet or floor in order to create a natural barrier.
  • Soothing balm. Lavender for dogs is a stress soother for skin and can alleviate irritated skin from insect bites and dermatitis. It’s also a good anti-inflammatory and a healer for wounds and burns.
A relaxed dog lying on a pillow.

Preparing lavender oil for dogs at home

If you have lavender flowers on hand, you can make your own lavender oil. The process is very easy:

  1. Gather fresh flowers and allow them to dry in the sun.
  2. Once the flowers are dry, crush them with a mortar, but without breaking them too much.
  3. Heat the flowers in a saucepan with water or another oil on low heat for several hours.
  4. Strain the oil and store in a jar, away from the light.

With this homemade oil, you can also create soaps or use it as an air freshener. Of course, rather than making your own oil, you can also purchase it from a pharmacy or herbalist. The purer the oil and the fewer additives it contains, the better the quality will be.

Remember to keep in mind that you may need to dilute the oil to a certain extent depending on its concentration. Be sure to read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully before use.

How to apply the oil

It’s very important that you dilute lavender oil with water or another oil rather than applying it directly to your dog’s skin. You can start by testing a small diluted amount on your dog to make sure your pet isn’t allergic.

Remember to stay away from your dog’s eyes, nose, mouth, genital region, and anal region when applying oil. You can also perform a gentle massage on your dog’s back and belly while applying.

You can also fill a spray bottle with water and add a few drops of lavender oil. Then, you can use the mixture as a natural air freshener for your home, furniture, dog beds, etc. This way, the oil will serve as aromatherapy for your dog.

A dog receiving a relaxing massage.

Furthermore, there are shampoos and conditioners that contain lavender oil among their ingredients. You can use them to wash your dog as long as they are specifically made for dogs. You can usually find these products in specialty stores and veterinary centers.

Lavender oil isn’t the only oil you can use with your dog. In fact, there are various other oils that are also beneficial. These include chamomile, rosemary, marjoram, niaouli, mint, etc. Just remember that essential oils don’t replace medical treatment or veterinary diagnosis. Be sure to only apply oils as needed.

  • Cheryl Lans & Nancy Turner & Tonya Khan. Medicinal plant treatments for fleas and ear problems of cats and dogs in British Columbia, Canada, 2008.
  • Gabriela Barrera, Adriana Jakovcevic y Mariana Bentosela. Calidad de vida en perros alojados en refugios: Intervenciones para mejorar su bienestar, 2008.
  • The Bark, the dog culture magazine. Essential Oils And Dogs.